Propulsion Analytics and DNV join forces on Condition Based Maintenance

by 1, Apr, 2021Innovation, Maritime 4.00 comments

Propulsion Analytics, a Greek company providing vessel and engine performance evaluation applications, and DNV have received funding from Innovation Norway to develop a Condition Based Maintenance (CBM) application for ships.

The project will result in an innovative CBM service for ships, with validated methods and accredited tools that merge thermodynamic modelling with artificial intelligence to diagnose machinery system faults and predict performance in marine powerplants.

In this project Propulsion Analytics will further develop its analysis method and tools for the performance management of marine engines. This analysis method uses an innovative combination of physics-based process simulation models and data driven models using artificial intelligence (AI). This analysis provides the reference performance for a powerplant’s operating condition, which when compared to the actual data can diagnose and predict engine component malfunctions or any decreasing performance.

“Currently, less than 2 per cent of the world fleet employ a CBM arrangement, but in the next 10 years we expect that 10 per cent of the world’s fleet will use performance optimisation tools and CBM methods,” said Efstratios Tzanos, general manager of Propulsion Analytics. “Ship performance evaluation, incorporating efficiency optimization and improved maintenance scheduling can result in significant cost reductions for ship owners and operators. At Propulsion Analytics we are using cutting edge technology to develop an innovative CBM application and CBM service to meet these needs,” he added.

DNV has worked to develop a verification, validation and accreditation (VV&A) methodology to assess CBM applications. This methodology will significantly enhance the validity and trustworthiness of CBM approaches. DNV will draw from its maritime technical expertise and established methodologies already in use in the aerospace, defence and financial service industries and sectors.

“CBM holds the promise of safer, more reliable and competitive operation of maritime assets,” said Dr George Dimopoulos, head of R&D and advisory DNV – region South East Europe, Middle East & Africa. “In this project we are aiming straight for the heart of seagoing vessels – the marine engine. DNV will develop digital validation and verification methodologies to build confidence in the use of CBM for critical equipment and hopefully accelerate their deployment in shipping.”

 

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